Dismantle the large districts first…

Then dismantle the smaller ones.

When the Washington Post starts writing editorials like this, it can’t be long before more liberals start to see the light on education.

The Big Easy’s school revolution

But what really distinguishes New Orleans is how government has re­defined its role in education: stepping back from directly running schools and empowering educators to make the decisions about hours, curriculum and school culture that best drive student learning. Now, state and school-district officials mostly regulate and monitor — setting standards, ensuring equity and closing failing schools.

Rahm could just as easily shut down 125 S. Clark. Setting standards is ALL any state or city need do. Let 100s of new independent schools find the best way to meet those standards.

As for the teachers, once free of their unions’ golden handcuffs, they can find solace in once again being viewed as true professionals, and not the rent-seeking collectivized drones of the failed legacy system. From, the article…

One teacher I spoke with during a recent trip talked about the luxury of being pursued by different charter networks willing to pay for her talents. After 11 years of teaching, she said, it was the first time she felt she was being treated as a professional. I visited the classrooms of Sci Academy, where 99 percent of the students are minorities and 92 percent are eligible for free and reduced-price lunch. They have some of the city’s highest scores on statewide tests, and more than 90 percent of Sci Academy seniors have already been accepted to a four-year college or university.

Teachers need to realize that 100s of schools bidding for their talents is better than 4 or 5 districts doing the same. This bidding will eventually raise the pay of the most competent teachers. As for the rest, it shouldn’t be our problem.

It’s never a bad time to circumvent teacher’s unions

Fenty, Rhee Look for Ways Around Union
Proposals Would Set Stage For School System Rebuild

Mayor Adrian M. Fenty and Schools Chancellor Michelle A. Rhee are discussing a dramatic expansion of their effort to remove ineffective teachers by restoring the District’s power to create nonunionized charter schools and seeking federal legislation declaring the school system in a “state of emergency,” a move that would eliminate the need to bargain with the Washington Teachers’ Union.

Union’s penchant for protecting bad teachers exposes the myth that they support education. They support a bloated “full employment doctrine” for anyone who can squeezed under the wire. Once they get their dues, you get their protection, whether you incompetent or not.

Good teachers need to realize just how bad they look under the unionization of education.

If adopted, the measures would essentially allow the District to begin building a new school system. Such an effort would be similar to one underway in New Orleans, where a state takeover after Hurricane Katrina placed most of the city’s 78 public schools in a special Recovery School District. About half of the district’s schools are charters, and it has no union contract.

I’ve quipped that if every public school in America fell to rubble tomorrow, the educational outcomes in America would IMPROVE, as people did what was necessary to get their children educated. Hurricane Katrina has proven that theoretical scenario mostly correct, as the “disaster scenario” improved outcomes there.

The faster we can remove corrupt and mendacious unionization from our schools, the faster we can apply resources to actually educating our kids.