Pigs get fat, hogs get slaughtered

After a 25 year run up in obscene and unnecessary growth of greedy and corrupt government, it’s not only important to get out the the liposuction machine. It’s important to tie off the stomach. That would mean constitutional spending caps. (and yes, statutory spending caps are worthless).

New Jersey: A Blue State Deep in Debt Rethinks What’s Important

You know taxes are too high when even the liberals root for spending cuts.

New Jersey’s tough-talking new governor, Christopher J. Christie, the first Republican elected in 12 years, is grappling with a deficit in the billions by squeezing nearly everyone — school children, the elderly, mass transit, cities, suburbs, subsidized renters and home owners.

Other states are making painful cuts, too: Arizona, to name one, is ending state-funded all-day kindergarten and health coverage for 47,000 children from low income families, though its Republican governor is pressing for a sales tax increase to avoid even deeper sacrifices.

But what’s most surprising about New Jersey is how in such a blue, labor-dominated state, Democrats and union members seem to be cracking under the pressure of the state’s tax burden, revealing a kind of split-personality disorder.

The syndrome surfaced last summer during Mr. Christie’s campaign, when he vowed to bring New Jersey’s property taxes, the nation’s highest, under control. As a candidate he saved his sternest threats for the teachers’ and state workers’ unions, whose healthy pay and benefits packages, he argued, were slowly strangling the schools and running the state’s finances into the ground. Union members, state workers and teachers, it turned out, weren’t offended by his rhetoric. In fact, public opinion surveys showed they ate it up.

People who followed the New Jersey gubernatorial campaign might remember that Christie’s tough rhetoric didn’t start until the Wall Street Journal and other conservatives started complaining about how lame and milquetoast his campaign was.

The syndrome surfaced last summer during Mr. Christie’s campaign, when he vowed to bring New Jersey’s property taxes, the nation’s highest, under control. As a candidate he saved his sternest threats for the teachers’ and state workers’ unions, whose healthy pay and benefits packages, he argued, were slowly strangling the schools and running the state’s finances into the ground. Union members, state workers and teachers, it turned out, weren’t offended by his rhetoric. In fact, public opinion surveys showed they ate it up.

Patrick Murray, director of the Monmouth University Poll, said the surprising reactions were a reminder that Democrats and union members are also home owners, job seekers and parents — and that things have gotten so bad that even they might be willing to swallow some tough medicine and embrace once-unthinkable policies.

Christie then started to ramp up the rhetoric and differentiate himself. That is why he’s governor. Bill Brady should do the same, stop harping on the social issues, and go after property taxes and public employee unions. When people start paying attention to the unwarranted pensions and payroll bloat, they will do exactly what New Jersey voters did, and turn out the drones who are slaves to the public unions.

Pigs get fat, hogs get slaughtered. It is time to slaughter the hogs.